Author: Kate Campbell (page 2 of 15)

Fort Riley Museums Tell a Story of Adaptation

Dr. Robert Smith, Director of the Fort Riley Museums, declared that it has been adaptation that has kept Fort Riley open over the decades, evolving repeatedly to meet the army’s needs.

Established as a frontier post in 1853, at the time Fort Riley was situated at the “end of civilization.”  As the boundary of the frontier changed, however, the fort had to adapt its role to remain open.  By the late 1800s, it became a “school post” for the cavalry and light artillery and served as a haying station for the entire army.

When World War I began, Fort Riley was the largest U.S. training site for troops headed to Europe, and it continued to be a training site during World War II.  During that era, it became the Divisional Post for the First Infantry.

The First Infantry Division, known as “The Big Red One,” is the oldest continuously serving division in United States history, sending troops to France in World War I and to North Africa, to Sicily, and to England in World War II.  First Infantry troops participated in D-Day at Omaha Beach, were stationed in Germany during the Cold War, and went to Vietnam.  They were present for Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

 

LMH West Campus is Becoming a Reality

Russ Johnson, the CEO of LMH, talked about the new LMH Health West Campus development that broke ground in September 2018. Joining him were Rebecca Smith, Executive Director of the LMH Health Foundation, and Karen Shumate, Chief Operating Officer and project manager for the new facility.

The West Campus expansion has been designed to provide outpatient services, the primary source of revenue that is anticipated in the health care industry in coming decades.  The location of the new facility on Highways 10 and I-70 will be convenient for healthcare consumers.   Plans for easy and adequate parking have been highly important in the plans, as the current hospital location lacks adequate parking.   LMH West Campus will be 35-40% of the space at the current hospital.  Johnson expects the new building to be ready for occupancy in July 2020.

Shumate highlighted key features in the floor plan of LMH West Campus.  The goal is to build something “nice, but not ostentatious.”  The building incorporates flexible space and room for expansion.  There will be an outdoor ampitheater and a roof garden.  LMH physical therapy services, OrthoKansas, a pharmacy, a lab, and several local physician practices will relocate.  The second floor will be a Women’s Center, providing a continuum of care for breast patients at one location.

 

Liticia Cole Inducted into Lawrence Central Rotary

Leticia Cole stands with sponsor Steve Lane during her induction into Lawrence Central Rotary.

Leticia has worked for Paul Werner Architects for over 11 years.  She is a 2014 graduate of Leadership Lawrence and has been a board member of Catch-A-Break for the past two years.

Eileen Horn Highlights 2018 Legislative Action

Eileen Horn, State Representative for the 10th District, highlighted action during the 2018 session of the Kansas legislature.  Horn, a Democrat, was appointed to fill the House seat vacated by John Wilson in August 2017.  She worked as the sustainability coordinator for the City of Lawrence and Douglas County until December 2017 when she resigned to focus on her legislative responsibilities.

Although State revenues have begun to surpass projections in recent quarters, Horn noted that state taxes are still lower than in 2012.  She explained that after nine rounds of tax cuts, however, there were holes in the State budget that the legislature has had to address.

During its session last winter, the legislature found additional money for transportation projects, K-12 education, and child and family needs.  The State is catching up on its contributions to KPERS.  Higher education received 2% back from a prior cut.  The State’s water plan is funded now.  The judiciary and corrections each received money for staff.  Telemedicine was approved.

Kansas has ongoing financial challenges, however, especially in K-12 eduction.  In June, the State Supreme Court ruled that while the State’s new plan for funding education was now “equitable,” it was still not “adequate.”

Horn ways that the most rewarding part of her new work is to be able to help constituents with their problems.  Her biggest frustration is that  the schedule of the session and the low stipend mean that legislature is skewed to include those who are older and independently wealthy, that is, those who can afford the time and money to serve.

DG Parks Shares Her Enthusiasm for Rotary

District Governor Blanche Parks visited Lawrence Central Rotary, demonstrating abundant enthusiasm and commitment for her Rotary leadership responsibilities.

DG Parks joined the Downtown Topeka Rotary Club in 1999, serving as president in 2012.  She also served as Assistant District Governor and District Trainer. She was instrumental in establishing the first Rotary Leadership Institute for the District.

Parks worked for the State of Kansas managing and directing various state agencies. She is most proud of developing the Kansas Learning Quest 529 College Savings Plan.  Governor Parks serves on numerous boards and is very active in the Topeka community.

Her plans for the coming year include raising Rotary’s public image, a focus on utilizing technologies that are appealing to young people, increasing giving to the Foundation, and increasing club membership.

In closing, Governor Parks urged Rotarians to ”Recognize achievement, celebrate and have fun.”

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