Category: Healthy Lifestyle (page 1 of 4)

Thanks For Coming Out To The Fall Community Bike Ride!

On behalf of all of us at Lawrence Central Rotary, a big thank you!

On Saturday we hosted the 2nd ride of our “Community Bike Ride” initiative. In spite of warm weather, overlap with the KU football game, and a variety of other options, we were able to total 79 participants (by counting the waivers). We had another successful helmet giveaway – as well as providing neon safety vests and shirts.

For the year (both rides), we had 247 participants, we gave away 107 helmets, 98 vests, and 105 shirts (with shirt and vest totals only limited by our inventory). And, importantly, we had another successful year without injuries. We heard multiple people share that it was “…my first time on this trail!” and more than one family share that they were back with kids who had graduated from our training-wheel takeoff clinic (that Jane Huesemann leads). 

Speaking for the group – each time we help fit a child (or adult) with a helmet – provide them with a bright (neon) vest or bright shirt – we know we are proactively promoting well being (safety). It means a lot to us – and we could not pull this off without your help.

Below is a gallery of pictures (thank you Lynn O’Neal, Tobin Neis, and the folks at Friends of Lawrence Area Trails). Our fall ride that started at the Haskell Stadium parking lot and went up along the Burroughs Creek trail and back.

We are looking forward to coming back in 2019 and we hope you choose to be along for the ride!

Steve

Rideperson, 

Community Bike Rides

www.lawrencecentralrotary.org

Pictures from a community bicycle ride organized by the Lawrence Central Rotary Club. Starting at the Haskell Memorial Stadium and riding up and back on the Burroughs Creek Trail

Posted by Ride Lawrence on Monday, September 17, 2018

Lawrence Fall Community Bike Ride Set for Sept 15th

We’ve reserved the space, got the sponsors, now we need you to come out and enjoy our second 2018 Lawrence Community Bike Ride.

Here’s what we’ve got on tap for this year’s event from 10:00-12:00 at the Haskell Indian Nations Stadium parking lot:

  • Family Friendly Bike Ride With Safety
  • Kids Helmet fitting
  • Safety Vest Giveaway
  • Training Wheel Takeoff Area
  • Bike Checkup & Maintenance area
  • Healthy Snack Zone provided by The Merc
  • The always popular Lawrence Kids Calendar Kids Inflatable Zone!

The ride will be on Lawrence’s Burroughs Creek Trail which is a great, smooth concrete multi-use path that is wonderful for beginners as well as seasoned riders to have a safe place to ride and enjoy Lawrence’s Eastside.

Thanks to all our sponsors these annual events just get better and better.

All riders must fill out a release you can download one from this LINK.

(We’ll have them on hand too.)

Get this on your calendar! We look forward to seeing you!

 

Lawrence Is a 4-Star Community

Jasmin Moore, Sustainability Director for Douglas County, reminded Rotarians that Lawrence became a national leader in 2016 in quality of life measures, the first community in Kansas to earn a 4-STAR certification.  The STAR measurement framework (“Sustainable Tools for Assessment and Rating”) allows communities to track progress toward improved quality of life against seven sets of objectives–and to compare themselves with others working on similar goals.

Moore defines a sustainable community as one that is economically, environmentally, and socially healthy and resilent.  She uses a four-way test to evaluate sustainability initiatives:

How does it impact environmental health?
How does it impact the well-being of people?
How does it impact relationships, effective government, social justice, and overall livability?
How does it impact the local economy and at what short-term and long-term costs?

Originally from the Kansas City area, Moore chose to study urban planning at KU when she became intrigued with the idea that the built environment of a community influences the health of the community.   After a series of jobs in Colorado, Texas, Arkansas, and Johnson County, she has landed back in Lawrence.  Now she coordinates the City/County collaboration to develop integrated solutions and long-term investments for sustainability.

Lawrence Rotary Arboretum awarded Level I accreditation by ArbNet

The City of Lawrence Parks and Recreation Department’s Lawrence Rotary Arboretum that is maintained by local Rotarians and the Lawrence Parks and District Department has been awarded a Level I Accreditation by the ArbNet Arboretum Accreditation Program and the Morton Arboretum, for achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens.

The ArbNet accreditation program is the only global initiative to officially recognize arboreta at various levels of development, capacity, and professionalism. The Lawrence Rotary Arboretum is now recognized as an accredited arboretum in the Morton Register of Arboreta, a database of the world’s arboreta and gardens dedicated to woody plants.

The Lawrence Rotary Arboretum was conceived in 2003 and dedicated in 2005 as a project by the three local Rotary Clubs in Lawrence, the Lawrence Rotary Club, the Jayhawk Breakfast Rotary Club and the Central Rotary Club as a fundraising activity to commemorate the centennial of Rotary International. Funds raised went toward the waterfront gazebo.  The arboretum began development with the addition of new trees having identification markers which detailed the scientific name of the tree.  Gardens were also added, including a certified Monarch Watch waystation, providing habitat for butterflies.

Additional projects such as a performance stage, bike path rest station, and Westar Pergola were completed by local scout troops and other volunteer groups.

Recently, an inventory of trees was developed through the department’s use of TreeWorks mapping software and using GIS to develop an interactive storyboard.  The storyboard creates a self-guided tour of the arboretum, detailing trees planted within the arboretum with photos and common and scientific names of each species of trees via the internet. It can also be helpful to those visiting the park and can pull up the site on a mobile device. To visit the ESRI storyboard of the Lawrence Rotary Arboretum, please visit: http://lawks.us/2xCmOih.

ArbNet is an interactive, collaborative, international community of arboreta. ArbNet facilitates the sharing of knowledge, experience, and other resources to help arboreta meet their instructional goals and works to raise professional standards through the ArbNet Arboretum Accreditation Program. The accreditation program is sponsored and coordinated by the Morton Arboretum, in cooperation with the American Public Gardens Association. and the Botanic Gardens Conservation International. The program offers four levels of accreditation, recognizing arboreta of various degrees of development, capacity, and professionalism. Standards include planning, governance, public access, programming and tree science, planting and conservation. You can find more information about ArbNet at www.arbnet.org.

For more information, please contact Crystal Miles, horticulture, and forestry manager, at (785) 832-7970.

Maximizing Independence for People with Disabilities

Independence, Inc. in Lawrence serves both people with disabilities and the communities where they live. Organized in 1978, the agency was the first Center for Independent Living (CIL) in the area, according to Bob Mikesic, co-director for the agency. Currently, it is one of about 400 CILs across the nation. Douglas, Franklin, and Jefferson counties benefit from its programs and services.

Cooking is one of the most popular classes that the agency offers among its training programs. In addition to teaching such independent living skills, classes create friendships and good times among peers who use the agency. In addition, Independence, Inc. provides advocacy, peer counseling, information and referral, and transition services of various types. It can also help to locate assistive technology, telecommunications access, and medical equipment for the disabled. Disabled people can find a ride to a medical appointment, learn to manage their finances, and get a document transcribed into Braille at Independence, Inc. The youth employment program provides jobs for young people with disabilities aged 15 to 21. The Haskell Avenue location houses a computer learning center and accessible meeting rooms as well as agency offices.

By promoting self-reliance and advocating personal rights and choices, Centers for Independence work to make individuals productive and to stay interconnected with their communities. There were no laws requiring accessibility or reasonable accommodation when CIL initiatives began in the 1960s, and employment options for the disabled were limited. After years of advocacy, CILs saw Congress pass the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, a law that provided rules and regulations to open the door for disabled people to manage a job and their own lives. More recently, one-third of the people who benefited from the Affordable Care Act’s expansion of Medicaid were the disabled.

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