Category: News (page 1 of 64)

Music Filled the Room

Excaliber, a choir of seventh and eighth graders from Central Memorial Middle School, performed for Rotarians and their guests at the annual holiday luncheon.  

Marchiony Shares Update on KU Athletics

Jim Marchiony, KU Associate Athletics Director, Public Affairs

Jim Marchiony has watched men’s basketball grow from being locally televised to being available  everywhere, even on your phone.

Marchiony, KU Associate Athletics Director, Public Affairs, came to Lawrence in 2003. Prior to that he worked for the NCAA for 18 years, the last five of which he was media coordinator for the NCAA Division 1 men’s basketball tournament.

This isn’t Marchiony’s first time living in the Sunflower State. A native-New Yorker, Marchiony and his wife, also from New York, lived in Shawnee Mission prior to joining the NCAA. “We like to say we’re the only two New Yorkers who have moved to Kansas twice!”

Marchiony is proud to work for one of only 60 higher education institutions that are part of the Association of American Universities, which combined award 50 percent of all doctorate degrees nationally.

 “A University of this caliber deserves a successful athletic performance.”

Marchiony said that the priorities of his department are clear: the health, safety and well-being of the athletes, and education. “Even students with a professional future, we owe it to them to help keep them on track so if they don’t make it or after they make it they have something to fall back on.”

To that end, KU will cover tuition for any student that leaves early for a professional career and comes back later to finish their degree.

“Why is it important to have a good athletic department? Athletics can serve as a window to the university. We’d love it if 50,000 people crammed a stadium to listen to a lecture. With the society we live in, this is not going to happen. Athletics can draw people in and increase the pool of future students who come here.”

Marchiony said the department needs a significant increase in donations, especially for the football program. “Athletics funds itself. We have 5,000 to 6,000 donors right now and we need over 10,000.” In comparison to other Division 1 schools, KU has 10-12 fewer staff in football. “We are decades behind and it shows in our record.”

Happy Thanksgiving Week!

Just a reminder we are not meeting this Wednesday, November 21st, 2018.

Below is the link for our annual wreath sale! Please forward to family and friends, 20% of sales come back to our club to help fund the community projects we do as a club.

The link to order this year is: http://bit.ly/lcrholiday18

KPR Plans for a Bright Future, Even with Funding Cuts

Dan Skinner, Director of Kansas Public Radio (KPR), sees a bright future for the station, even though funding has changed significantly in the last few years. The effects of State and University budget cuts have trickled down to KPR, with the University defunding the Audio-Reader Network and cutting $200,000 in direct funding to the station.

Since coming on the air as KANU in 1952, the station has received 17 “Station of the Year” awards and now operates across eight different frequencies. 72% of KPR’s current funding comes from individual donors and underwriters. Skinner shared that “sound fiscal management has given a sound operating reserve.” This is especially important as the station may need to “pull on reserves over the next couple of years to raise more money.”

KPR is part of the Kansas News Service, which is a collaboration between multiple news resources, ensuring that efforts and resources aren’t duplicated across the state. Skinner projects that over 100,000 listeners tune into KPR per week.

Skinner addressed the fact that some people think of public radio as being one sided. “It really depends where you are on the political spectrum.” He says he hears people say that the station is to conservative and others say it’s too liberal. That’s perfect, he joked. “We want to be a source of civil conversation where you can hear divergent ideas.”

With the changes in funding, Skinner is most concerned about the Audio-Reader Network, which has been giving the “gift of sight through sound” since 1971. The program has over 400 volunteers who read newspapers, magazines and books, as well as over 1,600 hours of specifically requested materials each year. The program is the second oldest in the nation, and one of the largest programs of its kind. The program is free to clients, who receive a radio receiver for the subcarrier frequency. Clients can also access programming through the telephone reader service.

Fort Riley Museums Tell a Story of Adaptation

Dr. Robert Smith, Director of the Fort Riley Museums, declared that it has been adaptation that has kept Fort Riley open over the decades, evolving repeatedly to meet the army’s needs.

Established as a frontier post in 1853, at the time Fort Riley was situated at the “end of civilization.”  As the boundary of the frontier changed, however, the fort had to adapt its role to remain open.  By the late 1800s, it became a “school post” for the cavalry and light artillery and served as a haying station for the entire army.

When World War I began, Fort Riley was the largest U.S. training site for troops headed to Europe, and it continued to be a training site during World War II.  During that era, it became the Divisional Post for the First Infantry.

The First Infantry Division, known as “The Big Red One,” is the oldest continuously serving division in United States history, sending troops to France in World War I and to North Africa, to Sicily, and to England in World War II.  First Infantry troops participated in D-Day at Omaha Beach, were stationed in Germany during the Cold War, and went to Vietnam.  They were present for Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

 

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