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Masks: Mystery and Beauty

Carla Hanson, curator of a traveling exhibit called “Spirit of the Mask,” shared her collection of masks and their stories. Masks can cover the face, head, and even the entire body, as demonstrated below by Rotarians Bob Swan and Jim Peters as they tried on masks and garments associated with the plague in medieval Europe. Created using all types of materials, masks play a role in dance forms, storytelling, ritual, and celebration.

Hanson’s collection includes masks from more than 45 countries and cultures of the world. She brought examples from Native American tribes, Peru, Nigerian, Guatemala, Tibet, Bali, Russia, and more. Many were renderings of animals, reptiles, or the faces of spirits. In addition, there were Santa Claus costumes and Halloween masks familiar in the United State and a mask of a “nisse,” a white-bearded creature from Nordic folklore.

Hanson will be teaching a course about masks for Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Olathe and in Kansas City this spring .

Focus on Rotary Foundation

LCR member Janis Bunker is a passionate advocate for PolioPlus, Rotary Foundation’s drive to eradicate polio in the world.  When she attended the 2017 Rotary International conference in Atlanta last June, she joined roundtable discussions about the effort. Beginning in 1979. Rotary International began its fight against polio with a multi-year project to immunize 6 million children in the Philippines. Over the past decades, Rotary has partnered with the United Nations, the Organization of American States, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to fund and implement the project.

Today, Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan are the only countries where polio remains endemic. Although there were only 17 cases reported during 2017, work to ensure that the virus does not emerge once again will continue for ten years after the last case is reported.  Even as monitoring for new cases continues, the infrastructure of laboratories and immunization clinics works to manage outbreaks of new diseases in the world.

Michael Steinle, chair of the Foundation Committee for Lawrence Central Rotary, outlined the six areas of focus that define the work of Rotary Foundation.  They are (1) promoting peace; (2) fighting disease; (3) providing clean water, sanitation, and hygience; (4) saving mothers and children, (5) supporting education; and (6) growing local economies.  Contributions to the Foundation support projects aimed at these initiatives.  The Foundation is proud to be known for delivering 91% of each contribution dollar to help these efforts.

 

Buy A Wreath – Make a Difference – Order Holiday wreaths & decorations now from Lawrence Central

Lawrence Central continues our annual fundraiser for the work we do every year. As in year’s past, we will be selling wreaths and other holiday decorations from Lynch Creek Farms and in Lawrence Central’s partnership with them, we receive 20% back from every sale to help fund the service projects we do.  Some examples of our service activities include:

We want to continue to do this work and more with help from you and all you need to do is simply purchase holiday decorations. You can do this by talking to any of our members or there’s an even easier way – visit our Lynch Creek fundraising website, peruse what they have, an order yourself!  We’ve even set up an easy link:

http://bit.ly/lcrholiday17

If you’re not comfortable with ordering online we totally understand – you can also call Lynch Creek direct toll-free at 1-888-426-0781 and please Lawrence Central Rotary Fundraiser #100925.

Lynch Creek is a family business that started in 1980, now transformed from selling a few flowers and vegetables at the local farmers’ market on the weekends, to a full-blown year-round business that ships throughout the United States.

We could go on about how great these wreaths are, but when we were at the Lawrence Rotary Club recently,  Jennifer Berquist stopped us and told us this,

“Last year, for the first time, I purchased several Lynch Creek items as holiday gifts. Those who received the evergreen gifts were so pleased and impressed with the quality. It is a huge seller for me that the Lawrence Central Rotary Club receives part of the profits. I will definitely place another order this year!” – Jennifer Berquist – Lawrence, KS 

Lynch Creek Farms have been amazing to work with and they care about the groups that sell their wreaths and decorations. Here’s a video about the business.

Kressig and LaClair Welcomed into LCR

Kevin Kressig and Chip LaClair are new members of Lawrence Central Rotary.  President Fred Atchison inducted the two during the November 30 club meeting.  Sponsors Steve Lane and Jim Evers participated in the ceremony.

Standing left to right in the photograph:  Atchison, Lane, Kressig, LaClair, and Evers

Ramsdell and Meyer Inducted into LCR

Bob Ramsdell (left) and Kade Meyer (right) were inducted into Lawrence Central Rotary on Wednesday, November 15.  After the brief ceremony, President Fred Atchison asked both men to tell the group more about themselves.

Bob Ramsdell said that before earning a law degree at KU, he spent 21 years as an artillery officer in the Army.  He then worked eighteen years in a local law partnership.  In July 2017, Bob set up a solo law practice in Lawrence focusing on estate planning, probate, trusts, wills, and elder law.  He and his wife are originally from Maryland; they have two adult children who live in the area.  Bob was drawn to Rotary because he has many friends who have been involved in the organization.  He selected Lawrence Central Rotary Club because it is small enough for friendships and big enough to get things done.  In his free time Bob likes to read history and biography and enjoys photography.

After a six-year stint in the Army Reserves, Kade Meyer returned to Topeka where he and his two siblings had grown up.  He followed his father’s lead into the insurance industry and currently works as an insurance account representative in Lawrence, specializing in life insurance.  As Kade launches himself professionally, he knows he needs to connect to the community.  Joining a Rotary club has been an ideal way to do so, but he has also gotten involved with a number of other groups and initiatives in both Lawrence and Topeka.  Kade chuckles as he acknowledges he chose Lawrence Central Rotary because of our reputation as “the fun group.”  In his free time, Kade enjoys listening to podcasts and to a variety of other media.

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